Alexander Gordon of Lismore, 7th Baronet

Personal data
Date of birth (prefix)
abt.
Date of birth
1715
Date of death
1782-00-00
Alias
Alexander Gordon of Lesmoir
Biography

Alexander Gordon of Lismore, 7th Baronet. Son of Alexander Gordon (b. ca. 1679), sometime Collector of Customs in Aberdeen, and Isobel Gordon (b. ca. 1695). According to Boswell, he was "a gentleman of good family (Lismore), but by the extravagance of his relations, to whom he left the care of his estate, had lost it." Gordon was Professor of Medicine at King's College, Aberdeen, from 1766 until his death in 1782.

Alexander Gordon of Lismore is not directly related to Alexander Gordon (1752-1799) who became a physician in Aberdeen in 1785, and who later obtained an MD from and taught at the University of Aberdeen.

Life with Boswell

On August 22, 1773, in Aberdeen, while on their tour of Scotland and the Hebrides, Dr Johnson received a card from Sir Alexander, who had been an acquaintance of Johnson in London in the 1750s. According to Boswell, "Johnson rejoiced to hear of him [and w]e sent for him to come and dine with us. I was much pleased to see the kindness with which Mr Johnson received his old friend."

Sir Alexander came to them again on the next morning, together with Principal Campbell, Professor Thomas Gordon and Professor Ross, as well as Dr Gerard. After going together to see Marischal College, they all went to the Town Hall, where Dr Johnson was presented with the Freedom of the City.  After this, Sir Alexander took Johnson to see Old Aberdeen, while Boswell went with Thomas Gordon to visit Rev. Riddoch and Mrs Dallas. Boswell and Johnson dined at Sir Alexander's together with the Provost and Professors Ross, Dunbar and Thomas Gordon. After dinner, they sauntered in Sir Alexander's garden, and Boswell wrote how it was "agreeable to see the contentment and kindness of the worthy, harmless man."

At the end of this busy day, Johnson "owned to me that he was fatigued and teased with Sir Alexander’s doing too much. I said ’twas all kindness. “Yes, sir. But sensation is sensation.”".